This effect for Mental Couple Having Abandoned

How sad if your soul mate leave so soon, but he’s been promised as lively as dead with you. But what can I say if God had willed another. All you need is a change in the anticipated physical and mental condition of the wife after her husband left.

From a study conducted by graduate student Donald Robinaugh and psychology professor Richard McNally of Harvard University revealed that the death of a beloved is one of the most depressing experiences a person can face.

In most cases, this grief is going to disappear over time. But for people who suffer from complicated grief (grief accompanied by mental disorders such as depression, anxiety, and emotional and behavioral disturbance), they will likely continue to miss their loved ones, showing negative emotions and feeling hopeless about the future.

Similarly, patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or major depression, the researchers also showed that people with complicated grief is hard to recall specific memories of his past. The difference is, people with complicated grief can still remember the incident in the past involving the deceased.

Robinaugh and McNally were interested in this cognitive paradox that occurred to another question on their minds: is the memory of the deceased spouse are also shaping our thinking about people with complicated grief future?

To find out the answer, researchers recruited a number of adults who had recently lost her partner in a period of one to three years. A number of participants is seen showing signs of complicated grief, while some other participants tend to show signs of grief are more typical.

Then each participant was asked a series of tests to assess the extent to which their memory of the memories of the past and their ability to imagine events in the future, either with or without the deceased.

Participants were also asked to describe certain specific events if the researchers proposed a number of positive words (eg, safe, happy, successful, loved) and negative words (such as pain, sadness, fear, anger).

From there it is known that participants who suffered from complicated grief showed a decrease in the ability to recall specific autobiographical memories and imagined certain future events compared with participants who only normal to feel grief, especially for events that do not involve the deceased. However, participants found no significant barriers when asked to explain the events involving spouses who have died.

“What surprised us was the individual suffering from complicated grief is easier to imagine a future with the deceased than if without the deceased,” said Robinaugh and McNally.

“In addition, they continue to repeatedly visualize important events such as the birth of the first child or birthday golden wedding which of course is actually impossible. But the future is completely impossible just been imagined by the patient rather than the events that occur are realistic in the near future,” they .

To that end, this study encourages the importance of every person to have goals and aspirations for the future if an when a loved one or partner died. Because this is one of the most important component in the recovery period, especially from the experience of loss