At Menopause, More Women Should Beware of Diabetes

Everyone should keep their blood sugar levels at a safe level to avoid diabetes. But, you have to be increasingly vigilant when entering the menopause, apparently because shifting hormones affect blood sugar levels.

Levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone are experiencing a shift when a woman experiences menopause, can affect the sensitivity of cells to insulin. So that menopause symptoms can worsen blood sugar and make it less predictable.

A woman’s ovaries produce three different types of estrogen every month along with the menstrual cycle. When you are menstruating, levels of estrogen produced by the ovaries begins to decline.

Estrogens have a protective effect on the function of pancreatic cells and prevent premature cell death. Meanwhile, the pancreatic cells may also serve to increase production of insulin when required by certain conditions, such as diabetes.

The decrease of estrogen appears to cause pancreatic cells become resistant to insulin, thus worsening blood glucose levels circulating in the body. Insulin resistance causes no trouble cells absorb glucose from the bloodstream so that blood glucose levels are higher.

This can lead to diabetes complications over time. If you are taking medication to control blood sugar, either orally or by injection, take it regularly. It is important to monitor blood sugar levels to remain consistent during menopause.

Therefore, you have to be more vigilant with respect to lifestyle behaviors that support healthy blood sugar levels, such as exercise, stress management and healthy eating picky. Blood sugar can be maintained either through a healthy diet and consistent exercise every day.