Children who are Always Avoided from Vulnerable Fear Anxiety Disorder

Naturally, for parents to protect their children from the fear of such a thing as darkness, thunder, or a stranger. But prevent children from frightening situations can make a child is likely to have an anxiety disorder later in life.

According to new findings from the Mayo Clinic published in March in the journal Behavior Therapy, researchers confirmed that children who have always avoided the situation scary thought, would be more likely to develop anxiety disorders.

The study was done by measuring the level of anxiety about the more than 800 children aged 7 to 18 years. Researchers also conducted a survey of parents and their children if the child develops avoidance behaviors.

Most of the children answer the questions investigators with a statement like, “I avoid the things that make me scared” and “I ask parents and people around me to keep me from the scary stuff”.

Researchers conducted follow-up assessments back about a year later and found that children who always avoid the things that frightened him more likely to have a clinical anxiety disorders.

“Long-term behavior may be able to avoid dangerous because it makes the kids can not learn that the situation may not be as bad as they think,” says Stephen Whiteside, a child psychologist at the Mayo Clinic, who led the study, as reported by the Global and Mail, Saturday ( 16.03.2013).

It can make children unable to learn to handle challenging situations and make him feel anxious. Despite the fear, anxiety, and shame are normal, anxiety can be a nuisance in performing normal daily activities.

Whiteside estimates that only 30 percent of children with anxiety are getting help. A recent survey conducted by the Toronto District School Board showed that adolescents with anxiety disorders, are more worried about the future.

More than half said that such concerns cause him trouble sleeping and almost one in three survey participants said the feeling of wanting to cry. Whiteside noted that such children need cognitive behavioral therapy, which focuses on the reduction in avoidance behavior, which is an effective intervention for anxiety.

This therapy works by exposing kids to things that frightened and gradually help to face his fears. If a child is afraid of dogs, for example, the therapist might bring dogs into therapy sessions and slowly encourage children to spend time with her.

In the Mayo Clinic study later, 25 children with anxiety disorders were asked to follow 7 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy for 7 to 9 weeks. At the end of the study period, a score of their aversion to things that scare him dropped by half.